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Category Archives: Anna Karenina

And the gold for smartness goes to . . .

The Olympics are on.

I’m going to ignore all the political barbs, social commentary, and ugly sweaters. Instead, its time to focus on what I know: Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy.

Whoa.  It felt good to write that sentence.  Isn’t this WEM Degree making you feel smarter by the minute?

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Posted by on February 7, 2014 in Anna Karenina, Crime and Punishment

 

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Some Dads

Happy Father’s Day Sancho, Christian, Gulliver, Mr. Bennett, Fagin, Mr. Brockelhurst, Arthur Dimmesdale, Ahab, Arthur Shelby, Charles Bovary, Marmeladov, Vronsky, Damon Wildeve, Gilbert Osmund, Pap Finn, and Tom Buchanan.

Thanks for not being my dad.

You see, he’s pretty awesome.  And you guys, well, let’s just say that you’re best left where you are:  inside the covers of a book.

Dad Dance

 

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Not to Bum You Out

I’m so tired of all these women dying.  I’ve nearly lost track of them, first it was Helen, then Emma, Alyona and Lizaveta, Anna, Eustacia, and now Lily. Why?  Why must we read so much tragedy?  Why the death?  What’s wrong with a happy ending once in a while?

Then I stumbled across this article in my facebook newsfeed.  Friends, it’s worth the read (it even mentions three of our authors.)  The subject is tragedy.  The context is Christian worship.  The backdrop is our life.

If you only click on one external link today, I encourage you to choose the one above.  You can even leave the arguments about worship behind, but I’d love to know what you think about the tragedy vs. entertainment question.

Is our WEM reading list reminding you that we live in the valley of the shadow of death?  Is it drawing you face to face with the world of iniquity from which we would rather shield our minds?  Are the authors and their sin-filled worlds making you cling firmly to the Author of creation?  Is the despair of the characters wakening a vision of the evil that surrounds us outside the pages of fiction?  Or, are the novels a source of pacification and escapism?  Are the classics entertaining?  Should the classics be entertaining?

 

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The Fastest 300 Years EVER!

Sancho and the donkey.  Christian.  Yahoos and Houyhnhnms.  Elizabeth and Darcy.  Oliver.   Bertha-in-the-attic.  Hester and Pearl.   Moby Dick.   Uncles and Madams.  Rascal.   Anna-Kitty-Levin-Vronsky-oviches.   The Heath.   Isabel.   Huckleberry.   The Journeys of Henry and Marlowe.   And now Lily, whose outcome, at least for me, is still uncertain.

While paging through the Well-Educated Mind list of fiction books, I realized that Don Quixote was published in 1605 and House of Mirth in 1905.   300 years!  I congratulate myself and you, fellow readers, on plowing through 300 years of literature.   May the crop be plentiful!  I suggest a glass of red wine and some good chocolate to celebrate.

 

 

Lily’s Russian Cousin

I mentioned in this week’s check-in that I was seeing a few similarities between
Lily Bart and Anna Karenina.

Chapter 2 Lily uses a paper knife to “cut the pages of a novel, tranquilly studying her prey through downcast lashes while she organized a method of attack.  It was with Anna K that we first learned about paper knives.

Later in the same chapter Lily does a little clever maneuvering on the train to get Percy Gryce’s attention. On several occasions Anna Karenina manipulated men with her attentive ear and lovely looks.  Sometimes she did it to get something she wanted and other times it seemed she did it for her own amusement.  Hmmm…There are times when Lily does the same thing.

In chapter 12 Lily steals the show at the Brys home.  The women are doing the artistic tableaux  Remember what she wears?

Her pale draperies, and the background of foliage against which she stood served only to relieve the long dryad-like curves that sept upward from her poised foot to her lifted arm.

Anna’s dress was black, but she also knew exactly what to wear to make herself shine.

Have you noticed other similarities between these two characters?

 
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Posted by on May 4, 2013 in Anna Karenina, The House of Mirth

 

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I Thee Read

Another blogiversary, another year of reading bliss.

Blogiversary Two

For better, . . .

Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Crime and Punishment
Anna Karenina
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
The Red Badge of Courage

for worse, . . .

Madame Bovary
The Return of the Native
The Portrait of a Lady

for richer, . . .

Rodolphe Boulanger
Augustine St. Clare
Stepen Arkadyevitch Oblonsky
Lord Warburton

for poorer, . . .

Berthe Bovary
Sofya Marvelodov
Avdotya Romanovna Raskolnikov
Jim

in sickness, . . .

Nikolai Demitrich Levin
Ekaterina Alexandrovna Shcherbatskaya
Ralph Touchett
Clym Yeobright

and in heath, . . .

Pansy Osmond
Huckleberry Finn

till death us do part . . .

Evangeline St Clare
Uncle Tom
Emma Bovary
Katerina Ivanovna Marmeladov
Alyona Ivanovna
Lizaveta Ivanovna
Anna Karenina
Mrs. Yeobright
Eustacia Yeobright
Damon Wildeve
Daniel Touchett
Ralph Touchett
Grangerfords
Pap Finn
Miss Watson

So who did you love and cherish most this past year?

 

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The eye(lids) have it.

Anna Karenina and Eustacia Vye don’t seem to have much in common.  There is that “grass is always greener” thing they have going.  Yes, yes… that “looking for love in all the wrong places” thing.  The desire for happiness that causes them to make poor decisions, but other than that…

Russian socialite.  Hater of the Heath.  Not much in common.

I did notice a similarity in their eyes.  Particularly their eyelids.  Did you notice it too?

Anna Karenina:

Kitty gazed at her in dismay as she went up.  Anna looked at her with drooping eyelids, and smiled, pressing her hand.  But, noticing that Kitty only responded to her smile by a look of despair and amazement, she turned away from her, and began gaily talking to the other lady.

Anna, taking her eyes off her friend’s face and dropping her eyelids (this was a new habit Dolly had not seen in her before), pondered, trying to penetrate the full significance of the words.

Eustacia Vye

Well it is what I call no water,” she said, blushing, and lifting her long-lashed eyelids as if to lift them were a work requiring consideration.

One touch on that mouth again!  there, and there, and there.  Your eyes seem heavy, Eustacia.”

So if the eyes are the windows to the soul, what are our leading ladies trying to hide?  Perhaps Eustacia tells us the answer:

“No, it is my general way of looking.  I think it arises from my feeling sometimes an agonizing pity for myself that I ever was born.”

Or maybe Dolly Oblonsky knows why Anna picked up this habit:

And she remembered that Anna drooped her eyelids just when the deeper questions of life were touched upon.  “Just as though she half-shut her eyes to her own life, so as not to see everything.” thought Dolly

Interesting.

PS.  Just out of curiosity, I used the kindle to check Madame Bovary for references to eyelids.

And, according to what she was saying, her voice was clear, sharp, or, on a sudden all languor, drawn out in modulations that ended almost in murmurs as she spoke to herself, now joyous, opening big naive eyes, then with her eyelids half-closed, her look full of boredom, her thoughts wandering.

 

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