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Short and Not So Sweet

In my fatuity I ignored the directions of the cicerone and fell right through the crenellations yelling, “Oh, chit!” because I wanted the young girl with the cell phone to call 911, of course.


Hebdomadal ReviewDespite the absence of words at the beginning of the week, we will continue on with our review.  Take the words below, put them into some sort of composition, post them in the comments, and wait patiently for me to smile in awe and joy.
fatuity
cicerone
chit
crenellations

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2013 in The Portrait of a Lady

 

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Take that, Henry James.

Sometimes writing these sentences makes me querulous because I lack the perspicacity, trenchancy and assiduity to think of ways to use the words, instead I find myself incommoded and want to prevaricate.

Hebdomadal ReviewHenry James isn’t the only one who can write complex sentences.  Go ahead take these words, write up your own little ditty, and post it in the comments.  It will make me less querulous.  Here are the words:
incommoded
prevaricate
querulous
assiduity
trenchancy
perspicacity

 
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Posted by on February 2, 2013 in The Portrait of a Lady

 

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It’s Back

With very little truckling, a great deal of jocosely behavior, and possibly even some invidiousness, it’s safe to say I’ve never experienced a prosaic evening in a caravansary with our family of seven, and any mountebank who claims it’s possible is, well, a mountebank.

Hebdomadal Review

It’s been a long time, so I’ll review the rules, suggestions, pleas for participation.  Make up your own composition using as many of these words as you can and post it in the comments. The words are:
invidious
jocosely
prosaic
truckle
caravansary
mountebank

 
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Posted by on January 26, 2013 in The Portrait of a Lady

 

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Four Words. Try Them.

I’m not a mountebank and there’s nothing fishy here, so just ignore that smell of carrion and chip in some money to fund the exchequer of our new reading phalanstery.

Jump in and write a sentence! It’s a perfect week to get your feet wet – only four words, and one of them is even a rerun from The Scarlet Letter.  YOU CAN DO THIS!!!  (Sorry, I felt the need to shout like Dostoevsky’s characters.
phalanstery
carrion
exchequer
mountebank

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2012 in Crime and Punishment

 

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Nursery Duty

The odalisques took so many baths to slake their desire for cleanliness that their amber shoulders became pruny and they surfeited water, so instead they picked up damascened sheers and put their pruniness to work in pruning and espaliering the garden trees in hope that their husbands would someday say “sta viator amabliem conjugem clacas or at least the shrubbery she worked so hard to sculpt.”

This is the end of the line for Madame Bovary vocabulary.  Give these words (and phrases) one last sentence:
slaking
odalisques
surfeit
damascene
espalier
sta viator amabliem conjugem calcas

 
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Posted by on July 14, 2012 in Madame Bovary

 

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When at first you don’t succeed, punt.

After a dithyrambic performance of the closing hymn the priest offered up vituperations to the organist, then grabbed some malmsey and the pyx and through the means of the sacrament brought both he and her a healing unacheived by any tisanes.  Meanwhile at the dock, some stevedores unloaded crates off a ship.

These are the words, with which you too can construct a sentence.  Or two.
dithyrambic
malmsey
tisanes
pyx
stevedores
vituperations

 
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Posted by on July 7, 2012 in Madame Bovary

 

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Hebdomadal Plus

My family grew corn, not greengages, but technically they were still pomologists, and the pigs we raised made quite an effluvia; we didn’t have chatelaines for our keys because our houses didn’t have locks, we weren’t feckless, just trusting; we didn’t add osmazomes to our food, it didn’t need anything false; no silk foulards adorned our heads, just well-seasoned caps; and there were no tocsins to let us know of incoming bad weather, you just hit the basement at the sight of swirling clouds, because even a wag knew that you didn’t joke around with a tornado.

Here are all of the Madame Bovary words to date. Don’t feel like you need to use them all, or put them in one sentence.
feckless
wag
foulard
chatelaines
greengages
osmazomes
effluvia
pomology
toscins

 
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Posted by on June 30, 2012 in Madame Bovary

 

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